‘Will you help me, please?’ Bedridden great-grandmother, 98, cried out 321 times in an hour – but her carers ignored her, reveals shocking secret film taken inside homes

A forthcoming Panorama documentary is going to be about abuse of the elderly in care homes. In the Mail Online report with video footage of ‘care’ workers abusing the elderly (link below) all the workers appear to be women. We’ll have to wait for the programme to see what proportion of the abusers overall were women. It’s often claimed that women are better suited than men for such work as they’re intrinsically more caring. Ha.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2616339/Slapped-bullied-supposed-care-Secret-filming-reveals-appalling-catalogue-abuse-homes-elderly.html

About these ads

About Mike Buchanan

I'm a British writer, publisher, and men's human rights advocate ('MHRA'). My primary focus is leading the political party I launched in 2013, Justice for men & boys (and the women who love them). We expect to publish our manifesto for the 2015 general election on 1 September 2014. I still work actively on two campaigns I launched in early 2012, Campaign for Merit in Business and Anti-Feminism League. In 2014 I launched The Alternative Sexism Project, aiming to raise public understanding that the sexism faced by men and boys has far more grievous consequences than the sexism faced by women and girls.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to ‘Will you help me, please?’ Bedridden great-grandmother, 98, cried out 321 times in an hour – but her carers ignored her, reveals shocking secret film taken inside homes

  1. More often than not, women choose jobs like this because a: they’ve been told they’re automatically caring and b: they’ve been told to have a career. Then they realize that they aren’t the most caring people after all (after all, Western women are bred to be hypermasculine, aggressive, impatient, ambitious and proud) and that most deeply caring women are part-time primary school teachers and mothers (because those are the two career choices that attract people who are genuinely nurturing), not full-time, money-hungry employees caring for other people’s neglected parents and grandparents.

    To boot, the elderly care system is like private nannies. The system can be so unregulated that it’s easy for someone inappropriate to get in and make a mess of their job. Compare that to primary schools or foster homes where, bar the odd incident, the carers are generally nice, loving people who have, will have or can’t have family of their own. Care homes are inundated, staff are not employed as selectively as they should be nor screened as frequently as they should be, budgets are tight and family visits are rare. The whole thing needs overhauling.

    Short form for any woman who thinks she’s being clever going into care: if you wouldn’t have kids of your own, raise them with love and personally care for them 24/7, or offer to care for a friend’s elderly grandparent for free (including the gross bits) out of the love of your heart, then caring is the wrong field for you.

  2. nrjnigel says:

    Simply statistically,given an overwhelmingly female workforce, women will be abusers. Certainly in care, education and hospitals there are female abusers and this is a refutation of any notion of men or women being uniformly good or bad. A more subtle but powerful effect is the decline in belief in moral equality and personal responsibility and agency. There is nothing more effective in these sectors than principled and active “matrons” managers or senior teachers setting and enforcing high standards . The vogue ,most clear in the popular brands of current feminism, for undermining the expectation for personal responsibility and duty fromCitizens and workers . In favour of concern with workers feelings or excuses frequently protected because they are from a “protected group”. Yet those with least protection are actually the most vulnerable , the young , old and sick of both sexes.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s