Melanie Phillips (2013): ‘A startling 60% of female doctors leave the profession altogether’

Following Kathy Gyngell’s outstanding article published by the Telegraph yesterday, we thought it timely to provide a link to an article written by Melanie Phillips for The Daily Mail in 2013.

Our spineless political classes are no further forward than in 2013 in admitting the direct cause of the various crises engulfing the NHS – the relentless feminization of the service. Dr Vernon Coleman was writing about the risk of such crises in the 1970s, when the feminization apparently started, attributing them to female doctors in general not having the same dedication to their work that male doctors traditionally had. Female doctors are more likely than male doctors to:

  • quit the profession altogether
  • work part-time, whether or not they have children
  • refuse to work unsocial hours, or carry out home visits, especially at night
  • refuse to work in the more stressful and demanding environments e.g. A&E
  • retire early

As Melanie Phillips points out, it is necessary to train two female doctors (£500,000) to deliver the same career output as from one male doctor (£250,000). The rational response would be to require all doctors to reimburse the state the cost of their training. Doctors’ remuneration is already wildly excessive, leading too many young people to seek a career in medicine for the income rather than for a vocation. The average GP earns well over £110,000 p.a.

Before long, the only people using GP services regularly will be those who cannot afford alternative options, such as Babylon Health (£4.99 pcm). I’m about to subscribe to the service myself. My (male) GP is outstanding, but the last time I wanted to make an appointment to see him, the earliest available appointment was two weeks away.

About Mike Buchanan

I'm a men's human rights advocate, writer, and publisher. My primary focus is leading the political party I launched in 2013, Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them). I still work actively on two campaigns I launched in early 2012, Campaign for Merit in Business and the Anti-Feminism League. In 2014 I launched The Alternative Sexism Project, aiming to raise public understanding that the sexism faced by men and boys has far more grievous consequences than the sexism faced by women and girls.
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5 Responses to Melanie Phillips (2013): ‘A startling 60% of female doctors leave the profession altogether’

  1. sanity2014 says:

    60%! Wow. What a wasteful,inefficient system we live in…The world according to feminists.

  2. stevenbrule says:

    The same thing happens in Canada. I personally know two female physicians, neither of them work as physicians. One went off to do environmental activism, the other did a law degree (but doesn’t work as a lawyer either).
    A lot of women collect their degrees as status symbols, and to snag a higher status husband, not in order to provide a lifetime of service (which is typical of men). This is yet another topic that nobody can address without being accused of misogyny.
    The empress certainly has no clothes.

  3. MacOisdealbh says:

    This situation was totally predictable. I agree with everything that Steve has said above. To add to it we the taxpayers are paying twice for this, first subsidizing the cost of their education and then having to find and fund replacements for the ones that don’t fulfill their promise to us all. Not to mention the ones that go to part time positions or retire early forcing more burden on the taxpayer. This kind of situation is happening in all roles in society. A friend recently attended a trade school for an Electrician certification where 20% of the class was female. Near the end of the course two of females revealed that they weren’t really interested in staying in the trade but there just there to pass time while looking for what they really wanted to do and there leaving the trade as soon as the government funded course was over.. In other words, looking for a husband to support them, while leaving less room for men that were taking the training seriously as a stepping stone for a path through life.

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