Sgt Kirsten Treasure: Met officer dismissed for ‘ignoring’ stabbing of Andrew Else, 52, which led to his death

Our thanks to Stuart for this. From the article:

A Metropolitan Police sergeant has been dismissed for failing to respond to a fatal attack in which a man was stabbed more than 200 times.

Sgt Kirsten Treasure, who worked in Croydon, ignored an initial call for assistance to the stabbing on 24 April 2014, a misconduct hearing was told…

The misconduct hearing on Friday was told Sgt Treasure used racist and homophobic language on three occasions between 30 December 2013 and 13 April 2014, as well as on 12 other occasions on unspecified dates.

It was further alleged in May 2014 she had refused permission for an officer to investigate a shoplifting incident.

The following month she was accused of asking an officer to provide her with the names of colleagues who had complained about her behaviour. She was also accused of pressurising an officer not to give evidence against her.

Ch Supt Matt Gardner, from the Directorate of Professional Standards, said: “The catalogue of misconduct by this officer is truly shocking.”

About Mike Buchanan

I'm a men's human rights advocate, writer, and publisher. My primary focus is leading the political party I launched in 2013, Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them). I still work actively on two campaigns I launched in early 2012, Campaign for Merit in Business and the Anti-Feminism League. In 2014 I launched The Alternative Sexism Project, aiming to raise public understanding that the sexism faced by men and boys has far more grievous consequences than the sexism faced by women and girls.
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2 Responses to Sgt Kirsten Treasure: Met officer dismissed for ‘ignoring’ stabbing of Andrew Else, 52, which led to his death

  1. epistemol says:

    A good idea to include the picture.
    I think it gives a clue..

  2. cadburycat says:

    Took an awful long time to be rid of her taking into account the magnitude of the dereliction of duty.

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