Boys and Ritalin

Our thanks to SDW for posting the following comment in response to Paul Elam’s video, ‘The Psychology of Hate’. He writes:

Thank you again Mike for the opportunity to raise awareness of this disturbing subject.

In regard to the topic of psychology, psychiatry, and the feminisation of society I would respectfully point any self-respecting genuinely caring and compassionate man (or woman for that matter) in the following direction… Please type into google three simple words :

‘Boys and Ritalin’.

Then simply read and consider.

It’s all there. I would urge all self respecting individuals to consider the role that psychiatry and education is playing in the misappropriation of mental-health ‘care’ practice.

Institutionalised malpractice must be identified and corrected wherever it is found. I suggest that the use of psychiatric pharmaceutical remedies for young people is an unacceptible corruption of the process of ‘healthcare’. It is time to take the initiative. The medication and effective sedation and pharmaceutical personality adjustment of growing lads in this society (to suit a predominently female perception of what constitues masculinuty) must stop.

Those self-serving individuals who are wilfully diagnosing, prescribing, and supplying toxic pharmaceuticals to children (in this case predominently boys) must be educated: Leave the boys alone if you do not understand them. And better still, involve capable men in the process of mentoring and guiding boys through their formative years. The education system is predominently a female managed organisation. This is a statistical fact. The guidance of boys in difficulty has become a female biased process. Boys without fathers being raised by single mothers attending schools managed and run by women are struggling to make sense of masculinity and their role as boys and men in the community. We cannot allow their guidance to come almost excusively from women. That is not logical.

I would not expect male teachers and male SEN psychiatrists to coach and lead teenagers girls through puberty. I cannot for the life of me understand why we stand back and let a female-orientated psychiatric and educuation system decide the fate of the current generation of boys.

This is a scandal which we as a society appear to accept on the assumption that ‘care givers’ always ‘know best’. The reality is not that simple. I would go further to suggest that the process of Munchausen by Proxy has taken on an institutionalised form within psychiatry and the education system today. The labelling of children, particularly of boys experiencing social and emotional difficulty, is a reflection of the ineffective pastoral leadership prevalent within our culture. To blame and drug boys because they are socially and emotionally confused is outrageous and as responsible men we have a duty to stand up and defend the young men of our community, and to protect them from a systematic feminist-based gender-biased socio-politically motivated psychiatric education policy.

These appear to be harsh statements. Many women are doing their absolute best with good intention to provide a balanced experience for boys and girls. However the element of masculine influence and guidance within eduation and psychiatry determine that tjose good intentions are not necessarily direction official policy in either field.

I would reasonably emphasise that the objective of education, and psychiatry within education, is to raise self-awarenes and to empower developiing individuals. It is not intended to subdue, to submit, or to control the behaviour of individuals whether male, female, young, or old.

In order to have self-awareness and understanding it is necessary to have clarity of thought. Faith in one’s own capacity to fulfil ones own potential is the most important element towards fulfilling one’s own potential. The developement of autonomy depends on having faith in ones own decision making ability. The prescribing of drugs to ‘fix’ a child’s behaviour or perceptions is counter-productive and prevents that childs ability to acheive an understanding of self-control and responsibility in the interest of the self and others. It actually creates a culture of reliance and dependance on others.

I would repeat my gratitude in conclusion. Thankyou for reading these words and for taking the time to consider the content here. The younger generation need our support in their journey towards effective lives of contentment.

With Concern and Best Regards SDW.

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About Mike Buchanan

I'm a men's human rights advocate, writer, and publisher. My primary focus is leading the political party I launched in 2013, Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them). I still work actively on two campaigns I launched in early 2012, Campaign for Merit in Business and the Anti-Feminism League. In 2014 I launched The Alternative Sexism Project, aiming to raise public understanding that the sexism faced by men and boys has far more grievous consequences than the sexism faced by women and girls.
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10 Responses to Boys and Ritalin

  1. cadburycat says:

    Boys need competitive sport to burn off excess energy, not drugs.
    Nor do they need a coursework based curriculum designed for the plodding conscientiousness of girls.

  2. Colin says:

    I was diagnosed with ADHD by a female psychologist when I was a kid and given first Ritalin and then, once I’d lost enough weight for everyone to worry, I was switched Dex Amfetamine Sulfate, which I was on for a long time.

    I only ever remember telling the doctor that I felt fine, I had troubles of course – bullies and the like, and trying to pay attention to a boring curriculum – but I trusted her, and being 11 was curious about what the pills could do for me. I don’t have clear memories of the Ritalin, but the Dex – the first two days I didn’t sleep, I drew intricate pictures and had boundless focus – and I am not going to lie, it was great. But you know how drugs are, that comes with experience, the initial buzz faded and I became dependent on them just to operate normally, whatever normal was – I didn’t know.

    Dex Amfetamine, I think, has left me less than healthy as they kept doling out the drugs well into my adulthood – I only stopped when I in my late twenties and had finally realised that I didn’t need or want the medication, and now as I approach 32 I am experiencing the feeling of strength and independence for the first time, but I am trapped in a world that I fell into because I felt worthless.

    If I could go back to then, I’d spit those pills out and do it all myself, and I get a lot farther than I did on the pills.

  3. Spent much of my son’s school years fighting off heavy handed pressure from school system to drug him, even though he was not ADD, a made up issue. Giving amphetamine derivatives to children should be criminal.

    • Colin says:

      Would love to hear more about your situation. What the school did, what your son was like… etc. I was given amfetamines for years, but I never knew anyone else’s story.

  4. sanity2014 says:

    FEMINISTS just can’t bear the fact boys are more competitive than girls, just like men are compared to women. Must today feminist contaminated BBC reported that a girl in China survived a collapsed building under the bodies of her parents, while the truth is it was the father’s body alone that shielded her. BBC can not stomach the fact a father saved her life. This shows serious faults in society.

  5. nrjnigel says:

    Thank you for reproducing this. Though its understandable that the un picking of sexism in education is focused on the gaps in achievement. A similar gap is all too evident in those who are treated as “trouble”. In my professional life I worked with young adults with “challenging behaviour”. All too many had the same antecedents to their eventually washing up in service just one or two steps from the criminal justice system. Single parents, “half” siblings, conflicts with mum’s partners, trouble at school, diagnoses of various attention deficit disorders or autism in early to mid teans, exclusion from school and “home” mid to late teens. By the time I’d come across them you’d have to work hard to find their redeeming qualities. The “treatment” that seems to get somewhere is basically parenting. Going back and starting again.
    Now this problem does affect girls but they get an easier ride and “treated” earlier. Partly because boys appear to be considered “bad”(its their fault) in a way girls aren’t often seen. Partly because boys are seen as scary to the professionals(teachers, Ed. Psychologists, Social workers). However overall the net effect is that boys are being failed in ways that are systematic and “gendered”.

  6. sanity2014 says:

    Female teachers together with female doctors are literally abusing boys entrusted in their care by forcing them to behave like girls and feeding them drugs, instead of creating a healthy environment for them. That is basically a crime and men, especially fathers can not be excused for tolerating it, even if that means breaking the gentlemanly silence and verbally attacking the female teachers and female doctors. It must be done. It is long overdue. Men have a choice between being good fathers or good gentlemen. I think the former is the right choice in this circumstance, not the latter.

  7. sundanceweb says:

    (SDW personal edit note)…
    My apologies for a couple of grammatical errors in the ‘Boys and Ritalin’ statement above. Upon re-reading I noted them. A particular correction to the original statement is necessary here. I intended the paragraph starting with – ‘However, the element of masculine influence…’ to read as follows:

    ‘However, the domineering element of on-going educational/psychiatric leadership within eduation and psychiatry determines that the good intentions of positive and compassionate women within both fields are not necessarily followed, appreciated, or reflected by ‘official policy’ in either case’.

    I hope this makes that paragraph clearer.

    Thanks also for the replies here. They make very interesting experience based reading and perhaps represent a significant number of individuals who quite rightly and reasonable do not accept current ‘standards’ of appraisal or remedy regarding the mental/social/emotional health of children in this country today, specifically in this instance with regard to boys.
    – SDW

  8. Colin says:

    Reblogged this on Doubleplus Skeptical and commented:
    As a kid raised on medication, I am beginning to wonder if I have been cheated out of something.

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