Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize for Literature

Wonderful news. I’ve been a fan of His Royal Bobness since buying his More Greatest Hits Vol. II LP (1971) when I was 14, a mere 44 years ago. How time flies. I’ve seen him perform maybe five or six times, the most memorable being the first time, with my beautiful fiancee when I was about 20, at a huge open-air concert at Blackbushe Aerodrome, in Surrey. 1977 or 1978, I think. Special Snowflake (Laura Bates) and Kate Smurfwaite weren’t even born then. Happy days. We couldn’t have predicted the hell that was to come.

Hatchet-faced feminists will say Joni Mitchell should have won the prize. Ha. Don’t get me wrong, Blue (1971) is a remarkable work, one of my favourite albums of the last half century, but most of her output pales into insignificance compared with Blue or Bob Dylan’s huge canon. And no, that’s not a euphemism.

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About Mike Buchanan

I'm a men's human rights advocate, writer, and publisher. My primary focus is leading the political party I launched in 2013, Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them). I still work actively on two campaigns I launched in early 2012, Campaign for Merit in Business and the Anti-Feminism League. In 2014 I launched The Alternative Sexism Project, aiming to raise public understanding that the sexism faced by men and boys has far more grievous consequences than the sexism faced by women and girls.
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2 Responses to Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize for Literature

  1. epistemol says:

    This may be true, or apocryphal, you may know it or not.

    But the story goes that Bob was out and about on foot one night looking scruffy and disreputable, as is his wont.
    (Americans rarely walk anywhere apparently).
    When the police stopped him and took him back to the nick where he had given his name as Robert Allen Zimmerman, muscian.

    He was treated with suspicion and no little disrespect as a potential crimbo and ne’er do well, but he said nothing.
    He was, eventually, recognised, apologised to, & feted amid the requests for his autograph etc.etc. – flesh out the story as you like!

    Pity they didn’t charge him with vagrancy or something, let it come to court and really look like fools!

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